Treaty of Kanagawa

Treaty of Kanagawa

TREATY OF KANAGAWA 4

Treatyof Kanagawa

Treatyof Kanagawa

Anunequal treaty is a binding agreement where one party to the treatytakes the larger amount of privileges than the other. The definingfactor in an unequal treaty is that the agreement favors the dominantparty, who seems to be the one running the terms of the agreement.Examples of these treaties are dominant in a series of treatiesbetween western countries with Asian countries like between theUnited States and Japan in the . In this treaty,the United States (foreign power) wanted to achieve dominance andcontrol. This was meant to accomplish trade and territorial controlas a way of achieving economic gains at the expense of Japan.

Toachieve this, the United States included a number of aggressivearticles in the treaty. Some of the aggressive articles are articleIII, article IV and article V. These articles are aggressive becausethey give the traders and ship, and shipwrecks of the United States apreferential treatment over other countries and even privileges overJapanese (Yale Law School, 2008). The traders are given exclusivityof accessing the maSimoda and Hakodadi markets, which is aggressivecompared to other countries (Yale Law School, 2008). However, articleVIII, article IX and article X. This is because the articles giveJapan some space to make decisions, such as allowing Japan tonegotiate with other countries and grant them some privileges.

Thesigning of these treaties was mostly done in the foreign language togive the foreign power the contractual advantage. This is because thesignatories of the local country were not versed with the foreignlanguage to comprehend the articles clearly. After reading, I learnthe imperial nation like the United States felt that the othersignatory, Japan was ignorant. The United States was just exertingits superiority and taking advantage of Japan’s ignorance.

References

YaleLaw School, 2008. Japanese-AmericanDiplomacy – March, 31, 1854.Retrieved From, &lthttp://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/japan002.asp#art10&gt