The Youth Food Bill of Rights

The Youth Food Bill of Rights

THE YOUTH FOOD BILL OF RIGHTS 7

TheYouth Food Bill of Rights

Outline

Paragraph1:

  • This paragraph candidly outlines the importance of Youth Food Bill of Rights towards enhancement of food security.

  • The first demand, mostly touching on the need to establish autonomous food systems relates to my life.

Paragraph2:

  • This section highlights the differences which modernity has had on the traditional farming methods not only in our village but also in other parts of the world.

  • For example, the pressure from the market has led to the disappearance of organic farming in my village back in up-country.

  • There have been significant changes between generations in regard to the use of organic farming methods, and this range from my grandfather to my father.

  • For example, my grandfather solely depended on manure to grow crops.

Paragraph3:

  • This section highlights the issues raised by RIC members towards traditional farming methods.

  • It is clear that, my grandfather, although he was not a college graduate, had the intelligence to know what is good for the soil and for the future.

  • This was despite the state law enacted in the mid-70s to compel farmers in the countryside to adopt efficient and modern farming methods as a way to increase food security

Paragraph4:

  • This section indicates the enormous role played by RIC members towards food sustainability, which is key millennium development goal.

  • The section also highlights the reason why I feel the need to be a RIC team member.

DRAFT1

Ofall the demands that the RIC members outline in their Youth Food Billof Rights, the first demand relates most to my life. The firstdemand states that, “we have the right to culturally-affirmingfood. We demand the preservation, protection, and reconstruction oftraditional farming, cultural history and significance of foodagriculture.”

Thepressure from the market has led to the disappearance of organicfarming in my village back in up-country When I was a child, mygrandfather did not bother to use inorganic fertilizers on the familywheat farm. My father also does the same but to a limited scale. Thework was tedious. It took a lot of time and energy top get thefarmyard manure on the trucks and take to the fields just beforeplanting. My grandfather did not do this to save some money. Heinsisted that using farmyard manure was good for the soil,eco-friendly, and sustainable Later, when I moved to high school, Ilearned that the nutrients were all the same to the wheat. I keptwondering why my grandfather insisted on using the bulky farm remainsyet inorganic fertilizers are less bulky and have the samenutritional value to wheat.I also remember the family farm producingthe same yield in 2005 without fertilizer applications. I researchedand found out that the continued use of farmyard manure kept the landfertile to the extent that the farm did not need any moreapplication.Officials from the department of agriculture also citedour family land as having less toxic build-ups than the farms fromthe nearby olive yards.

TheYouth Food Bill of Rights

Ofall the demands that the RIC members outline in their Youth Food Billof Rights, the first demand relates most to my life. The firstdemand states that, “we have the right to culturally-affirmingfood. We demand the preservation, protection, and reconstruction oftraditional farming, cultural history and significance of foodagriculture. We demand that indigenous people have the right toestablish their own autonomous food systems should they choose.”

Thepressure from the market has led to the disappearance of organicfarming in my village back in up-country. When I was a child, mygrandfather did not bother to use inorganic fertilizers on the familywheat farm. My father also does the same but to a limited scale. Thework was tedious. It took a lot of time and energy to get thefarmyard manure on the trucks and take to the fields just beforeplanting. My grandfather did not do this to save some money. Heinsisted that using farmyard manure was good for the soil,eco-friendly, and sustainable. Later, when I moved to high school, Ilearned that the nutrients were all the same to the wheat. I keptwondering why my grandfather insisted on using the bulky farm remainsyet inorganic fertilizers are less bulky and have the samenutritional value to wheat. I also remember the family farm producingthe same yield in 2005 without fertilizer applications. I researchedand found out that the continued use of farmyard manure kept the landfertile to the extent that the farm did not need any moreapplication. Officials from the department of agriculture also citedour family land as having less toxic build-ups than the farms fromthe nearby olive yards.

WhenI listened to the RIC members articulate their demands, I rememberedthe work of my grandfather. Indeed, the pressure from the market andsome state policies compel communities to give up culturallyaffirming farming methods (Kuhnlein, Erasmus, Creed-Kanashiro,Englberger, Okeke, Turner, &amp Bhattacharjee, 2006). Traditionalfarming is the best if my grandfather’s words and those of RICmembers are anything to go by. I consider what my grandmother wasdoing as a type of cultural farming because it had been passed on tohim by my great grandparents. A state law enacted in the mid-70scompelled farmers in the countryside to adopt efficient and modernfarming methods as a way to increase food security. Among them was touse inorganic fertilizer in place of farmyard manure. Farmers whobought organic fertilizers from state stores obtained incentives suchas free tilling from the state government. It worked because manyfarmers rushed for the incentive and abandoned what had defined ourfarming culture for decades. It was my grandfather who refused togive in. Although he was not a college graduate, he had theintelligence to know what is good for the soil and for the future.

Thedemands of RIC members are legitimate and right in time. It issurprising that the same state government that used incentives tokill our farming culture is back again, but this time it wants peopleto use more eco-friendly farming methods. Indeed, times change andvery soon I will apply to be a member of the RIC team so that I canshare my grandfather’s dream with rest of the world.

Reference

Kuhnlein,H., Erasmus, B., Creed-Kanashiro, H., Englberger, L., Okeke, C.,Turner, N., … &amp Bhattacharjee, L. (2006). Indigenous peoples`food systems for health: finding interventions that work. PublicHealth Nutrition,9(08), 1013-1019.