Public Policy Making

Public Policy Making

PublicPolicy Making

PublicPolicy Making

Makingpublic policies is a complex process because it involves manyparticipants with different interests, roles, and resources (Kraft &ampFurlong, 2012). Current policies such as the health care reforms andreduction in tax proposals are implemented to attain a particulargoal. Consequently, they provide financial incentives for themeaningful use to achieve social benefit. Policies emerge in responseto demands made by the public and actors in the government. Today,most principles are devised using various theories such as elite andrational choice.

Whenforming public policies, political parties, governmentrepresentatives, and leaders come together through a shared interestto create a public policy. These elites have a substantialindependent impact on government policy (Kraft &amp Furlong, 2012).However, it assumes that the interests of the ordinary citizens willbe fairly represented by those of the interest groups. The elite arewell-versed in the political processes and policies. On the otherhand, most people in the society are either ill-informed oruninterested in the finer details of the public policies. Therefore,the elite influence the mass opinion regarding these policies (Kraft&amp Furlong, 2012).

However,the elites also use of rational choice to promote democracy andencourage the public to accept the plan. The rational model isimplemented in public policies to ensure that they achieve maximumsocial gain (Kraft &amp Furlong, 2012). Hence, the policymakersensure that the public policies do not cost more than the benefitsoffer to the people. Accordingly, they must determine the society’svalues, all alternatives to the strategy, and the consequences ofthose choices. The policymaking process should be democratic with asmuch citizen involvement as possible rather than being the exclusivedomain of political experts (Kraft &amp Furlong, 2012). Thus, acombination of the two theories ensures that public policiessymbolize an adequate means of action used to achieve publicinterest.

Reference

Kraft,M. E., &amp Furlong, S. R. (2012). PublicPolicy: Politics, Analysis, and Alternatives.Thousand Oaks, Calif: CQ.