Japan and Southeast Asia

Japan and Southeast Asia

Japanand Southeast Asia

Japanand Southeast Asia

Japanis an Island country that comes from the hazes of Stone Age in theearly centuries. Japanese people accepted or rejected the impact ofthe Chinese people whenever they felt like it. This is according tothe Japanese history. This country has four main islands, which aredetached by a hundred of miles of open water bodies from thelandmass. These four islands are positioned in the outskirt of theKorean neck of land and Manchuria. The four major islands are Honshu,Kyushu, Shikoku and Hokkaido. It is worth noting that, almost a fifthof Japan’s mainland is fit for agricultural activities (Tolentino,2004). The climate of this Island Nation varies between subarctic andmoderate. In Asia, the people of Japan are deemed to be the same.These people have many features in common, thus making them almostsimilar. The two ethnic groups of Koreans and the Japanese seem to bemuch closer than the ethnic groups of the Chinese and the Japanese inthis region. This is well manifested in the inherent language of theJapanese. Japanese’ innate language is totally distinct from thatof the Chinese people. Despite the fact that these two tribes’written language seem to intermarry in a way, there are quite anumber of ways that these two groups’ written language is verydiverse. History records that the people of Japan are the progeniesof a certain goddess known as Sun Goddess. This tribe is ruled andgoverned by the emperor. Jamon is one group of Neolithic people thatemerged in the middle of the first millennium. This is according toArcheological statistics. The Jamon people were initially fishers,gatherers and hunters, but they later embraced the tradition of wetrice. The people of (JOH-mahn) occupied the Island of Kyushu andlived there. Their ancestors were buried in intricate embankmentsthat had ceramic figures. Centuries later, civilization saw thesepeople adopt the culture of rice farming, where the culture of Yayoiemanated from (Tolentino, 2004). Japanese people developed their ownculture from Chinese after the establishment of the capital in Heian.

TheJapanese people have embraced two main religions since timeimmemorial. These two religions are the inherent Shinto and Buddhism.Under Buddhism, there are three specific versions of Japanese thatoriginated from Korea in the sixth century. As noted by Tolentino(2004), these three particular versions are the Nichiren sects, thepure land, and the Zen. The Buddhism religion gained momentum inJapan due to its teachings of caring for the less fortunate in thesociety and its practices of meditation. The Shinto (SHIHN-toh) is aterm which means ‘the way of the gods’, is moderately close tothe Daoism of Chinese. The religion teaches that every regular ornatural thing or object has a spirit for worship. These spirits aredeemed to be undying as well as compassionate. This religion isprimarily optimistic of everything. There is neither single sacredbook nor theology of the gods under this religion.

Thegovernment and administration of Japan has undergone quite a numberof stages. One big government emanated in the Yamato (yah-MAH-toh)epoch way back in sixth and fifth centuries. Noble clans were thegoverning rulers before Yamato. Their prince was Prince Shotoku whopassed on in 622. Fujiwara and Yamato clans intermarried and becomethe leading bureaucracy in Japan for two centuries. In 710, Nara, thefirst capital was established in central Honshu. There were as wellSamurai warriors who believed that rather than surrendering, theywould rather die.

References

Tolentino,R. (2004). Transglobaleconomies and cultures: Contemporary .Quezon City: University of the Philippines Press.