Informed Consent

Informed Consent

InformedConsent

InformedConsent

Informedconsent is an essential process used by psychologist and otherresearchers working with human participants in order to get theirpermission to conduct research. For this process to occur there is aneed for mutual decision-making encounter between the participantsand the psychologist. This ensures the participant understandpsychologist professional relationship (`Obtaining informed consent`,2008).

Thepopulation of interest is the individuals with impairment. Thiscategory of individuals may have low mental ability to make informedconsent during the process of medical treatment or any other researchconducted by psychologists. This impairment calls upon a need by suchindividuals to develop new ways of giving sound and voluntaryconsent. The psychologist working with people having any form of suchimpairment should asses their level of consent before conducting eachprescribed treatment plan.

Thepsychologist has the provision to secure consent from their legallyauthorized substitute decision-maker (SDM) after diagnosing that aclient has this form of impairment, (‘Obtaining informed consent’,2008) or his or her own consent. Under this circumstance, consent bythe substitute decision-maker’s consent whether it is in agreementor refusal to the specific treatment, takes precedence. However, ifin the process of conducting the treatment, the person withimpairment becomes capable of making informed consent according tothe opinion of the health practitioner, the substitute decision-makerconsent becomes invalid and the patience informed consent takesprecedence.

Thepsychologist operation would be limited by the purpose of theresearch, the patient’s obligation to accept or reject the form oftreatment or their participation. The psychologist would have tocomply with the person to whom the patient may seek to get furtherinformation. In addition, the psychologist must provide opportunityfor the patient to ask question he/she may require and in turn begiven appropriate answers.

References

Barnett,J. E., Wise, E. H., Johnson-Greene, D., &amp Bucky, S. F. (2007).Informedconsent: Toomuch of a good thing or not enough? Professional Psychology: Researchand Practice, 38(2), 179–186

Nagy,T. F. (2011). Informedconsent.In Essential ethics for psychologists: A primer for understanding andmastering core issues (pp. 89–104). Washington, DC: AmericanPsychological Association.

Obtaininginformed consent. (2008). Nursing, 38(10), 27.doi:10.1097/01.nurse.0000337227.18841.e4