Disaster Management and Recovery

Disaster Management and Recovery

DISASTER MANAGEMENT AND RECOVERY 6

DisasterManagement and Recovery

DisasterManagement and Recovery

Theworld has seen its fair share of calamities and disasters bothnatural and man-made. More often than not, such calamities not onlybring immense losses but also have substantial impact on the lives ofpeople. As Werner &amp Locke (2014) note, it is often the case thatdisaster management efforts primarily concentrate on theenvironmental impact and other losses without paying much attentionto the social, emotional and psychological impacts of the disasters. It is often the case that the communities that are directly affectedby the calamities come together so as to enhance the psychologicaland social recovery for the community. As Norris et al (2012) notes, research has demonstrated that disasters have implications formental health for a considerable number of people who undergo theexperiences, with the effects being frequent and multifaceted, aswell as beginning quite early and lasting for a long time. As muchas not every calamity is traumatic, a large number of them come withan element of helplessness in the face of instinctual arousal,intolerable danger and anxiety. One of the projects that aimed atenhancing social and mental recovery was Project Rebound, which wascreated after the Gulf Oil Spill. This Project was based on therecognition of the fact that attending to the emotional and physicalneeds of the survivors is a fundamental element of recovery. Theproject was funded and sponsored by the Alabama Department of mentalHealth. The project involves sending mental health staff andcounselors to communities that have been impacted by the disasters.The counselors are required to work in the established social servicesystem so as to foster the victims’ emotional and mental recovery.

Question2:

Service-Area Definition

In-House

Level-of-Effort

Contracted Performance-based

Autonomous Oversight

Emergency only

Emergency only

Emergency or both

Medical Oversight

Not Required

Not Required

Not Required

Pre-Arrival Instructions and Call Prioritization

Not required

Not required

May be required

Staffing Level

Static staffing

Static staffing

Static or flexible

Deployment Method

Static

No incentive to match deployment to demand

Flexible

Theprovision of healthcare is at the center of growth and development ofany society. However, it is always imperative that the healthcareprovided be in line with the community needs and goals in both thelong-term and the short-term. Perhaps one of the most fundamentalaspects of healthcare provision is emergency medical services (EMS),which come in handy in saving lives when calamity hits a particularsociety. The matrix system that is presented above aims at enhancingthe efficiency of the ambulatory services or EMS through ensuringthat is collaborative ad cost efficient in the long-term.

Thereis some level of disconnect over the features and forms that would bedominant or rather the position of some features in the system.However, it should be noted that the community that is being examinedis primarily composed of emergency victims, in which case theircapacity to determine the vendor who would handle them in thelong-term is considerably limited. Few consumers plan for emergencyambulance needs, with local government having the say as far asvendor selection process is concerned (Stout, 1985). This makes itimperative that a provision is made to ensure that every otheressential equipment in the system is quickly operated and seized bypublic authority in case there is a major service breakdown. Theprovision is crucial since publicly operated entities and facilitiesoften lag behind as far as the provision of essential services isconcerned (Stout, 1980). The system that is under study does notperfectly fit into the matrix given the fact that every other systemis distinctive in its attributes.

References

Werner,D., &amp Locke, C. (2014). Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill on MentalHealth in Alabama Coastal Communities: &quotThe Loss of a Season&quot.International Journal Of Mass Emergencies &amp Disasters, 32(1),64-81.

Norris,F. H., Friedman, M. J., &amp Watson, P. J. (2002). 60,000 disastervictims speak: Part II. Summary and implications of the disastermental health research. Psychiatry: Interpersonal and BiologicalProcesses, 65(3), 240-260. doi:10.1521/psyc.65.3.240.20169.

Healthy,Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters: Strategies,Opportunities, and Planning for Recovery (2015). Developed byCommittee on PostDisaster Recovery of a Community’s Public Health,Medical, and Social Services Board on Health Sciences PolicyInstitute of Medicine. ISBN 978-0-309-31619-4

Stout,J (1980). 1980 HPEMS III “PUM Part III – The Major Constraints”(Stout)

Stout,J (1985). 1985 HPEMS “PUM Revisted, Part 1 – Origins” (Stout)

BledsoePUM Myths “EMS Myth #8: Public-Utility Models are the MostEfficient Model for Providing Prehospital Care” (Bledsoe)