CVI and DVT

CVI and DVT

CVI AND DVT 7

CVIand DVT

CVIand DVT

ChronicVenous Insufficiency (CVI) occurs when the veins in the body cannoteffectively pump the blood back to the heart. This mostly happens tothe veins located in the legs, where they cannot pump enough bloodagainst the gravity to reach the heart. Also, injuries andsuperficial phlebitis may lead to the occurrence of the CVI problem(Huether &amp McCance, 2012). Inaddition, the activities of body hormones such as those associatedwith pregnancy, my lead to the CVI problem(Weiss &amp James, 2014).High venous pressure is also a reason for the occurrence of the CVIand inhibits the flow of the blood back into the heart. Theoccurrence of the CVI is also associated with increased venomouspressure that transcends the venules, low rate of flow within thecapillaries, presence of plasma proteins, interstitial fibrin andinflammation.Onthe other hand, the Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) occurs when athrombus, which is a blood clot, forms in the deep veins in the body.The clot can form in either one or more of the veins in the body(Huether &amp McCance, 2012). Aspresented by Rudolf, one of the factors leading to this condition isvenous stasis causes by the slowing, obstructs or blocks the bloodflow in the venous (Patel &amp Brenner, 2014). Another factor is thecoagulation of the blood and damage of the veins, thereby inhibitingthe flow of blood(Williams, &amp Wilkins, 2012). Thedevelopment of thrombosis is influenced by homeostasis as it is ahomeostatic mechanism. While in CVI the blood flow is hampered by thefunctionality of the veins, the blood flow in DVT is impended by athrombus.Thesymptoms of CVI are swollen ankles, tightening of calves andheaviness of the legs. General tiredness as well as pains whenwalking may also be other symptoms of the CVI. The clinicalrepresentation of CVI is through tests and diagnosis, despite havinga difficulty in diagnosis as the symptoms is similar to otherdiseases. On the other hand, the DVT has the symptom of swelling inthe leg that is affected, which is different from CVI. In addition,the leg pains are also experienced, but in the affected leg only.Thetreatment for the CVI is done by doctors mainly to decrease the painand the possibility of disability. For mild cases, stockings areadvised as the means of compression and squeezing of veins. Inserious cases, doctors use Sclerotherapyto treat the affected veins with specific chemicals (Weiss &ampJames, 2014).Other treatment methods include ablation, bypass treatment, valverepair, vein stripping and angioplasty. On the other hand, thetreatment for DVT aims at preventing the enlargement of the bloodclot(Huether &amp McCance, 2012). Treatmentof DVT also seeks to prevent the clot from breaking and causingpulmonary embolism. After healing, treatment with blood thinnersmedication aims at preventing the future occurrence of the thrombosis(Patel &amp Brenner, 2014). However, blood filters may be used totreat the blood clot. The Impact of Human FactorTheimpact of human behavior on the vein problems and diseases isexperienced when the elements of behavior encourage in activity. Atthe same time, human behavior becomes a risk factor when it affectsthe normal functioning of the veins and encourages such conditions.There are two main aspects of human behavior that lead to orfacilitate the occurrence of vein diseases. These are lack ofexercises and poor diet(Williams, &amp Wilkins, 2012). Thesetwo aspects of human behavior specifically form a significant riskfactor for the pathophysiology of .Lackof enough exercises impacts significantly on the occurrence of CVI bycontribution to poor growth of the muscles that cover the veins. Withpoorly constructed muscles or less effective muscles, the rate of theblood flow in the veins is reduced (Bergan&amp Bunke,2014).This is particularly common in the legs, where inactivity keeps aperson in the same place without movement. The same factor ofinactivity is a risk factor for the occurrence of DVT, as the veinsare not well dilated and contributes to high blood pressure(Huether &amp McCance, 2012). Inaddition, lack of exercises encourages the formulation of blood fatand fats in the veins, which reduces the passage of blood. ThisIncreases the risk for the occurrence of both the DVT and the CVI.Poordiet and unhealthy eating habits impact significantly on theoccurrence of as a risk factor. This is because poordiets and unhealthy eating habits, coupled with inactivity leads toobesity and formation of blood fat and fatty veins (Bergan&amp Bunke,2014).As a result, patients of obesity develop other conditions thatincrease the risk of . This is because fatty veins lead tothe narrowing of the space for blood flowing through, and increasesthe changed for blockage by a blood clot (Bergan&amp Bunke,2014).At the same time, fatty tissues inhibit the functioning of themuscles surrounding the veins, which enhances the occurrence of theCVI. References

Bergan,J., &amp Bunke,N. (2014). TheVein Book.NewYork: OxfordUniversity PressUSA

Huether,S. E., &amp McCance, K. L. (2012). Understandingpathophysiology(Laureate custom ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Patel,K., &amp Brenner, B. (2014). Deep VenousThrombosis.Retrievedfrom, &lthttp://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1911303-overview#a2&gtSeptember 22, 2014

Weiss,W., &amp James, W. (2014). VenusInsurficiency. Retrievedfrom, &lthttp://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1085412-overview&gtSeptember 22, 2014

Williams,L., &amp Wilkins, L. (2012). Pathophysiologymade incredibly visual (2nd ed.).Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health