Brief Case Study Sharone, a Brain Cancer Surgery Patient

Brief Case Study Sharone, a Brain Cancer Surgery Patient

BriefCase Study: Sharone, a Brain Cancer Surgery Patient

BriefCase Study: Sharone, a Brain Cancer Surgery Patient

Thesocial and health cultures changes calls for the need for theincreased client participation in the process of rehabilitation(Dalley, 1999). The roles of both the relatives and patient havechanged during the recent decades, which should affect thetherapist-client relation as well as the methods use in datacollection and evaluation of the intervention. Person EnvironmentOccupational Performance Model (PEOP) is a client-centered model thatorganizes to improve the daily performance of the necessary andvalued occupations of the organizations, populations and individuals,and their meaningful participation in their environment (Hammond,1996).The occupational therapist can collect the following data as guidedby the PEOP Model occupational history, client perception, clientprofile, client long-term and immediate goals, the match between theclient’s goals and the occupation therapy, and activity performanceof the person. The data is important in that it directly related tothe client and its part of the PEOP Model.

Therelevant client factors (identified by using PEOP) can beincorporated into the OT treatment for the brain cancer surgerypatient through determining the baseline skill level, limitations,strengths, and the degree of the patient’s functional independence(Smith,&ampHudson, 2012).Additionally, through the sharing of the personal goals,expectations, and priorities can be also be incorporated into the OTtreatment plan. For instance, the occupational profile gives theoccupational therapist an insight into the patient’s priorities andbackground (Creek,&amp Lougher, 2012).The strengths and limitations are also important as they will helpthe OT to note the pre-morbid abilities of the patient that mayaffect his or her potential for recovery (Willard, &amp Schell,2012). Either before or after Sharone’s brain surgery, thefollowing information is available in regard to OTPF domains troubleremembering things (performance), has major changes in behavior ormoods, has hallucinations, and among others. The occupationaltherapist will impact Sharone’s occupations through improvement inher skills, the performance of the activities in a different way orthe identification of the assistive equipment that will make heraccomplish her tasks much faster.

Asan experienced OTA, I think that the following interventions will becrucial in helping Sharone. They include developing the occupationalprofile, analysis of the occupational performance through assessmentand observation, neuromuscular recovery programs, sensory stimulationprograms and management of the heterotopic ossifications.Additionally, I will recommend that her caregivers be educated onSharone’s condition and the vitality of following up on thehospital appointments. These interventions are important as they willimprove Sharone’s skills, independence, and safety.

References

Creek,J., &amp Lougher, L. (2011). Occupationaltherapy and mental health.Elsevier Health Sciences.

DalleyJ. (1999). Evaluation of clinical practice. Is a client-centredapproach compatible with professional issues? Physiotherapy 85(9):491-497.

HammondA. (1996). Functional and health assessments used in rheumatologyoccupational therapy a review and United Kingdomsurvey. BritishJournal of Occupational Therapy 59: 254-259.

Smith,D., &amp Hudson, S. (2012). Using thePerson–Environment–Occupational Performance conceptual model asan analyzing framework for health literacy. Journalof Communication in Healthcare,5(1),11-3.

Willard,H. S., &amp Schell, B. A. B. (2014). Willard&amp Spackman`s occupational therapy.Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams &ampWilkins.